URBAN ZEN COLLABORATES WITH
IFAM INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART MARKET

“Wear Your Impact” Initiative

Through the “Wear Your Impact” Initiative, Urban Zen and IFAM are raising awareness for conscious consumerism and encouraging our communities to purchase items that support international artisans, preserve their cultures and provide income and positive change.

Now in its fifteenth year, the Santa Fe International Folk Art Market will host more than 150 master artists from more than 50 countries on July 13 – July 15. As a guest curator, Donna Karan will bring together some of our long-time artisan collaborators and highlight their soulful products at this year’s market.

Preview how Donna styles some of her favorite Urban Zen and IFAM artisans, and learn about their inspiring stories.

Tunic and Pants by Somporn Intaraprayang

Somporn Intaraprayang

Thailand

Each item by Somporn Intaraprayang, crafted in partnership with Chinalai Tribal Antiques, has a story to tell, whether it’s the material – cotton, silk, linen or hemp that is foraged or cultivated – or the stitching and patterns that depict everyday life and embedded iconography.

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Necklace by Pascale Theard

Pascale Theard

Haiti

Pascale Theard’s life bears the mark of a dual culture. From her father, a Haitian art connoisseur, surrounded by painters and artists, Pascale was deeply touched by this mysterious country and its creativity. From her French mother, whose family’s leather factory was established in 1827, she inherited the love for beautifully tanned leather. Pascale’s accessories are handmade in the purest tradition of the artisans and shoemakers.

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Bag by Haiti Design Co.

Haiti Design Co.

Haiti

Haiti Design Co. is a socially-conscious artisan workshop in Port au Prince, Haiti that sells ethically-made leather goods, jewelry, handbags, and homewares.
The workshop was founded in 2014 with a goal to bring about sustainable development through design, training, and job creation. Their mantra is “Men anpil, chay pa lou” – and old Haitian proverb meaning, “Many hands make the load light.”

Vases by Jean Paul Sylvaince

Jean Paul Sylvaince

Haiti

Jean Paul was one of the first artisans that Urban Zen worked with in the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. Before that time, he had apprenticed under the Haitian impressionist painter, Ernst Louis Zor who mentored him for several years.

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Top and Necklace by Somporn Intaraprayang

Somporn Intaraprayang

Thailand

Each item by Somporn Intaraprayang, crafted in partnership with Chinalai Tribal Antiques, has a story to tell, whether it’s the material – cotton, silk, linen or hemp that is foraged or cultivated – or the stitching and patterns that depict everyday life and embedded iconography.

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Sarong by Bangie Anak Embol

Bangie Anak Embol

Malaysia

When designer Edric Ong came Malaysia to run a natural-dying workshop for Iban weavers, little did he know that it would be the beginning of a more than 20-year collaboration to revive the exquisite pua kumbu ikats of Borneo. Bangie Anak Embol has also created a cooperative contributing financially to the well-being of the 35 families in their longhouse; new respect and more harmonious communal living; preservation of Iban cultural heritage; and promotion of ecological sustainability through the use of natural dyes.

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Bracelets by Atelier Calla

Atelier Calla

Haiti

Atelier Calla is a jewelry, accessory and home decor workshop founded by Christelle Chignard Paul in 2007. She was inspired to bring the classic Haitian horn, bone and wood artistry to the next level. Traditional artisan work had been relying on the same design for decades and in an effort to reach a new market and revitalize artisan work, Christelle establish a workshop with skilled artisans in better and fair trade inspired environment.

Coat and Scarf by Somporn Intaraprayang

Somporn Intaraprayang

Thailand

Each item by Somporn Intaraprayang, crafted in partnership with Chinalai Tribal Antiques, has a story to tell, whether it’s the material – cotton, silk, linen or hemp that is foraged or cultivated – or the stitching and patterns that depict everyday life and embedded iconography.

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Head Wrap by Asif Shaikh

Asif Shaikh

India

Employing strikingly elegant, meticulously crafted techniques, master Indian textile artist Asif Shaikh creates fantastically patterned, vividly colored shawls, scarves and wraps. Asif works with handwoven silk and cotton that are block-printed and painted using natural dyes and further embellished with hand-embroidered elements on a scroll frame known as “karchob” – a creative heritage embroidery brought to India by the Mughals in the 16th century.

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Tassal Sandal by Pascale Theard

Pascale Theard

Haiti

Pascale Theard’s life bears the mark of a dual culture. From her father, a Haitian art connoisseur, surrounded by painters and artists, Pascale was deeply touched by this mysterious country and its creativity. From her French mother, whose family’s leather factory was established in 1827, she inherited the love for beautifully tanned leather. Pascale’s sandals and accessories are handmade in the purest tradition of the artisans and shoemakers.

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Silk Wrap (shown as a textile on the floor) by Federation Sahalandy

Federation Sahalandy

Madagascar

An association of silk farmers and designers, Federation Sahalandy provides ready markets for silk farmers and weavers, a skill that has been handed down from generation to generation in the Sandrandahy community. Associates are paid a fair, living wage, as are all of the women and men who take part in the making of each product; each member of the association maintains working connections with up to ten other community members.

Vest, Pants & Scarf by Somporn Intaraprayang

Somporn Intaraprayang

Thailand

Each item by Somporn Intaraprayang, crafted in partnership with Chinalai Tribal Antiques, has a story to tell, whether it’s the material – cotton, silk, linen or hemp that is foraged or cultivated – or the stitching and patterns that depict everyday life and embedded iconography.

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Silver Bracelets by Elhadji Koumama

Elhadji Koumama

Nigel

A 25th generation silversmith, Elhadji continues the Koumama family’s long artistic tradition with his elegant, highly refined range of silver adornments. The Koumama Family Collective now has forty silversmiths in Agadez and Niamey plus apprentices, polishers, sanders and beaders, and around 200 people are involved in production.

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Frou Frou Sandal by Pascale Theard

Pascale Theard

Haiti

Pascale Theard’s life bears the mark of a dual culture. From her father, a Haitian art connoisseur, surrounded by painters and artists, Pascale was deeply touched by this mysterious country and its creativity. From her French mother, whose family’s leather factory was established in 1827, she inherited the love for beautifully tanned leather. Pascale’s sandals and accessories are handmade in the purest tradition of the artisans and shoemakers.

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Silk Wrap (shown as a textile on the floor) by Federation Sahalandy

Federation Sahalandy

Madagascar

An association of silk farmers and designers, Federation Sahalandy provides ready markets for silk farmers and weavers, a skill that has been handed down from generation to generation in the Sandrandahy community. Associates are paid a fair, living wage, as are all of the women and men who take part in the making of each product; each member of the association maintains working connections with up to ten other community members.

Tunic by Somporn Intaraprayang

Somporn Intaraprayang

Thailand

Each item by Somporn Intaraprayang, crafted in partnership with Chinalai Tribal Antiques, has a story to tell, whether it’s the material – cotton, silk, linen or hemp that is foraged or cultivated – or the stitching and patterns that depict everyday life and embedded iconography.

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Silver Bracelets by Elhadji Koumama

Elhadji Koumama

Nigel

A 25th generation silversmith, Elhadji continues the Koumama family’s long artistic tradition with his elegant, highly refined range of silver adornments. The Koumama Family Collective now has forty silversmiths in Agadez and Niamey plus apprentices, polishers, sanders and beaders, and around 200 people are involved in production.

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Black Leather Bracelets by Pascale Theard

Pascale Theard

Haiti

Pascale Theard’s life bears the mark of a dual culture. From her father, a Haitian art connoisseur, surrounded by painters and artists, Pascale was deeply touched by this mysterious country and its creativity. From her French mother, whose family’s leather factory was established in 1827, she inherited the love for beautifully tanned leather. Pascale’s accessories are handmade in the purest tradition of the artisans and shoemakers.

Dress by Sulafa Embroidery Center

Sulafa Embroidery Center

Palestinian Territory

Sulafa Embroidery Center in Gaza, Palestine, provides employment for female refugees who handmake textiles using a variety of traditional and modern materials, patterns, and cross-stitch methods as well as a type of stitch traditional to the West Bank called Madani.

For centuries in this region, sewing techniques have been learned at home, usually passed from mother to daughter. Embroidery plays a central role in these women’s lives, providing not only income but also an opportunity to forge friendships and maintain their Palestinian identity.

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Scarf by Sidr Craft

Sidr Craft

India

Established in 1992, Sidr Craft is a social, artisan-based enterprise led by Abdullah and Abduljabbar Khatri that employs approximately 200 craftswomen from eight villages in Kutch, Gujarat, India. They specialize in the ancient process of Bandhani, which means “tying up.” These handcrafted scarves are composed of highly intricate dot-like patterns that are literally tied into the fabric, and then dyed using a complex dying process. Bandhani scarves take weeks, often months to complete.

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Black and Red Leather Bracelets and Crossbody by Pascale Theard

Pascale Theard

Haiti

Pascale Theard’s life bears the mark of a dual culture. From her father, a Haitian art connoisseur, surrounded by painters and artists, Pascale was deeply touched by this mysterious country and its creativity. From her French mother, whose family’s leather factory was established in 1827, she inherited the love for beautifully tanned leather. Pascale’s accessories are handmade in the purest tradition of the artisans and shoemakers.

Jacket, Pants and Tote by Somporn Intaraprayang

Somporn Intaraprayang

Thailand

Each item by Somporn Intaraprayang, crafted in partnership with Chinalai Tribal Antiques, has a story to tell, whether it’s the material – cotton, silk, linen or hemp that is foraged or cultivated – or the stitching and patterns that depict everyday life and embedded iconography.

Vest by Somporn Intaraprayang

Somporn Intaraprayang

Thailand

Each item by Somporn Intaraprayang, crafted in partnership with Chinalai Tribal Antiques, has a story to tell, whether it’s the material – cotton, silk, linen or hemp that is foraged or cultivated – or the stitching and patterns that depict everyday life and embedded iconography.

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Shawl by Qasab Kutch

Qasab Kutch

India

The mission of QASAB, a collective enterprise of 1,200 rural craftswomen from 10 ethnic communities from 42 Kutch villages, is to generate income for the area’s craftswomen, while also striving to preserve ancient art forms and culture in India’s Kutch region.

Fifteen years ago, tribal elders banned the elaborate embroidery work made by women, which escalated cost of living and burdened the women’s role of crafting for social customs, celebrations and wedding gifts. Initiatives like QASAB have created a process of dialogue with community elders that has opened doors to modern retail markets.

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Black Leather Bracelets by Pascale Theard

Pascale Theard

Haiti

Pascale Theard’s life bears the mark of a dual culture. From her father, a Haitian art connoisseur, surrounded by painters and artists, Pascale was deeply touched by this mysterious country and its creativity. From her French mother, whose family’s leather factory was established in 1827, she inherited the love for beautifully tanned leather. Pascale’s accessories are handmade in the purest tradition of the artisans and shoemakers.

Styled by Donna Karan
Photographer: Luca Babini
Models: Aline Lima & Jieun Hyeon

SNAPS AT THE EVENT

Collaboration with IFAM

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